Oral Pathology

The diagnosis of pathology is an important part of Dr Webber’s practice. Changes in the colour and texture of the lining of the mouth (mucosa) may be evident on the lips, cheeks, palate, tongue and gum tissue around the teeth.

Biopsy

If indicated, biopsies and other tests can be performed to diagnose problems and develop appropriate treatment plans. During a biopsy, a sample of tissue is taken to gain a histological diagnosis. Early detection and treatment of oral lesions greatly improve the patient's overall outcome. Lesions may be managed medically and/or surgically depending on the diagnosis.

Infection

Dental decay is not usually a life-threatening disease, however, if a tooth or oral infection spreads through the bone into the soft tissues, patients are at risk of deep tissue and blood infections (bacteraemia) which can possibly lead to hospital admission and airway compromise.

Removal of submandibular or sublingual gland

The most common reason for removing these glands is for blockages to the drainage apparatus. When the blockage occurs, ie. from a stone, the result is usually swelling of the effected gland. Blockage of the sublingual gland (aranula) causes swelling under the tongue, with blockage of the submandibular gland causing swelling under the angle of the jaw. If the glands require removal, it is usually performed under a general anaesthetic.

Cysts of the upper or lower jaws

These are fluid-filled sacs that can result in swelling, pain and infection. Some cysts become large and affect nearby healthy teeth. A cyst will not resolve by itself. If it starts to cause problems it is usually best to have the cyst treated before symptoms become worse.

The purpose of the treatment is to remove the cyst so that bone grows into the empty space. The two most common surgical treatments include:

  • Enucleation: This involves the cyst being opened and the lining of the cyst is removed.
  • Marsupialisation: The cyst is opened and part of the lining is removed, an incision is then made so that the remainder of the lining is continuous with the tissue inside your mouth.

While your surgeon makes every attempt to save teeth involved with the cyst, one or more teeth may have to be removed depending on the size and location of the cyst.

Further Investigations may include:

  • CT Scan
  • Cone Beam Scan
  • MRI
  • Blood Tests

Do not ignore suspicious lumps, ulcers or lesions within your mouth.  Please contact us via email or call 07 5527 8858 to schedule an appointment.